Catching Zebra

is a weblog by Andy Taylor

    Biz Stone gets Twitter’s servers ready for the royal wedding

Love how they can make a joke out of all the Bieber and Gaga fans.

Photo by Troy Holden.

    Biz Stone gets Twitter’s servers ready for the royal wedding

    Love how they can make a joke out of all the Bieber and Gaga fans.

    Photo by Troy Holden.

    That’s a big bridge by Rob Soulé

    That’s a big bridge by Rob Soulé

    FFFFALLBACK - A simple tool for bulletproof web typography.

    Web fonts are here, sparking an exciting new era in web design. FFFFALLBACK makes it easy to find the perfect fallback fonts, so that your designs degrade gracefully.

    Nifty. For some reason the preview is pink, rather than being in the original colours. But it’s an excellent tool for checking what the fallback fonts in your font stack will look like.

    A Sledgehammer Called OmniFocus

    Shawn Blanc:

    Finding the right tool to keep track of your projects sometimes feels more like a journey than a destination. Many task-management apps have come and gone (some of us have tried them all). But in the past few years, as task-management software has increased its footprint on the Mac, the one app which has stayed in active development and which continues to grow and improve is OmniFocus.

    I purchased the Mac and iPhone versions a couple of weeks ago. It has honestly taken me a while to get my head around. But now that I have it’s well worth it.

    After reading this I think I’ll have to grab the iPad version too.

    It’s in ALL CAPS because our lawyer said it had to be.

    Typekit Terms of Service

    The ALP Afterlife

    Excellent article by Julian Morrow in this months Monthly.

    The après-MP activities of these Labor figures stand in stark contrast to the predicament many faced when the parliamentary pension scheme was introduced by Ben Chifley in 1948.

    Après-MP is definitely the best word I’ve read this week.

    An especially grotesque feature of the system is that it effectively creates an incentive for our pensioner-pollies to undertake highly paid work in the private sector rather than continue to contribute to public life. The parliamentary pension is offset against other income received from the public purse. An “office of profit under the Crown” will reduce your parliamentary pension but an office of profit under Crown Casino – lobbying former colleagues to increase the profitability of gambling – will not.

    If you’re in Australia and you don’t already subscribe to The Monthly, do. $40 a year gets you through the websites paywall and an ePub version of the issue each month, which is brilliant.

    100% Natural. Who needs implants? How tissue engineering will radically enhance the future of medicine.

    Sharon Begley in the November issue of WIRED:

    …a discovery in tissue engineering, a process that could well be one of the most momentous medical advances of the 21st century: the use of stem cells—specifically stem-cell-enriched adipose (fat) tissue—to enhance, heal, and rebuild injured or damaged organs.

    Moar boob.

    Gmail Labs: Smart Labels

    I turned this on a month ago when it was released.

    I only just realised I’ve had far, far, far less shit in my inbox. I already had filters to get rid of some stuff, but this just got rid of all the crap.

    zero

    Do yourself a favour.

    Take off your shoes: you’re going to need more than just your fingers to count them all.

    Gruber

    Mr Scribble, the man from Footscray

    Haven’t laughed that hard in a while.

    via Adam Morris

    Why Do eBooks Cost So Much? A Publisher€'s Perspective.

    Publishers still have to pay for acquisitions, royalties, editorial development, copyediting, cover and interior design, page composition, cataloging, sales, marketing, publicity, merchandising (yes, even in a digital world), credit, collections, accounting, legal, tax, and the all the usual costs associated with running a publishing house.

    In addition, publishers have to incur at least three new costs…

    Marshall Major
These look amazing. Shame there’s mixed reviews about their sound quality.

    Marshall Major

    These look amazing. Shame there’s mixed reviews about their sound quality.

    Owsley Stanley: The King of LSD

    From the July 2007 issue of Rolling Stone.

    Amazing life. Aside from fueling a generation, he also invented the wall of sound:

    After two years of planning and problem-solving, the “wall of sound” made its debut on March 23rd, 1974, at the Cow Palace in San Francisco. Forty-feet high, it was composed of 604 speakers using 26,400 watts of power supplied by 55 McIntosh 2300s. With nine independent channels, the system was so powerful that the amps only needed to be turned up to two. Because the Dead controlled everything from onstage, no one had to mix from the house. Lesh likened the experience of playing through the system to “piloting a flying saucer. Or riding your own sound wave.” He also noted that the music made during the forty-odd shows when the system was used is still “regarded by Deadheads as the pinnacle of live performance.”

    Instapaper’s Arment: Seek Money From Customers, Not VCs: Tech News and Analysis

    Arment said his paying users have surprised him with their support. He started a $1 a month subscription plan in October that didn’t actually offer much in the way of extra features. It was more of a way to let users show their support for Instapaper. He said the response was overwhelmingly positive.

    Daily Drop Cap – Alphabet 10: S
Since 2009 Jessica Hische has been illustrating a drop cap just about every day. I remember seeing it back around the start when there was one alphabet. There’s now 12 by her and an additional guest alphabet.

    Daily Drop Cap – Alphabet 10: S

    Since 2009 Jessica Hische has been illustrating a drop cap just about every day. I remember seeing it back around the start when there was one alphabet. There’s now 12 by her and an additional guest alphabet.